Why Hemp (draft revised page)

Choosing hemp is simple act, but one that can change the world. It’s our goal at Jungmaven to get everyone in a hemp tee by 2020, as part of a larger mission to inspire shift in cultural thought and how we live. The clothes we walk through life in can also point us in the right direction– by choosing sustainable materials like hemp we are headed towards a healthier future for the planet.

So, why hemp? 

It's Natural and Healthy

It’s a natural fiber that thrives almost anywhere, with very little impact to the environment. Non-toxic garments and bedding reduce daily contact with hazardous chemicals present in most synthetic textiles.

It comes from Ancient Wisdom

It’s one of the world’s oldest crops. Remnants of hemp cloth from 8,000 B.C. were found in Mesopotamia, where it was used to make tunics and sailcloth.

It's All-American

It was an American staple until the 1930s. Washington and Jefferson grew hemp, and it was even used in some cases as currency. You could pay taxes with hemp in America from 1631 until the early 1800s. Betsy Ross’s original flag, the first drafts of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were all made from hemp.

It Heals Soil

It requires no irrigation, pesticides, synthetic fertilizers or GMO seeds. Many hemp-made materials are naturally resistant to mold, mildew and insects. Hemp removes toxins and radioactive chemicals from the soil. Scientists planted it at Chernobyl to reduce soil toxicity after the nuclear disaster. It is a highly effective phytoremediation plant, meaning it restores balance to environments by cleaning the soil, air and water.

It's Versatile 

Hemp has over 25,000 reported uses. It can make textiles, rope, beauty products, paper, building materials, biofuel, foods and more.

It Can Replace Plastic

Hemp fiber is incredibly strong and versatile, suited to become a highly functional bio-plastic that can be used to make everything from food wrappers to stealth fighter aircrafts. It’s easier to mold and weighs less than most other materials for composite paneling and is recyclable and biodegradable.

It Reduces Deforestation

One acre of hemp produces the same amount of paper in a year as four acres of trees. Hemp paper is also incredibly strong, resists decomposition and doesn’t discolor like wood pulp paper. It lasts so long it is often considered archival quality. All school books were made from hemp or flax paper until the 1880s, and the first drafts of the Constitution and The Declaration of Independence were drafted on hemp paper.

It Heals Soil

A phyto-remediation plant, it restores balance to environments by cleaning the soil, air and water. It was planted at Chernobyl to reduce soil toxicity.

It's Antibacterial

Hemp has natural antimicrobial properties, which not only makes it stronger and more durable than other natural textiles– but also helps prevent bacteria growth. It has moisture-wicking properties that mean less chance of the mold and fungus that often grow and hide in the weave of other fabrics.

It's Strong, Soft & Breathable

It gets softer with each wear, and its strong fibers are much more durable than their cotton or synthetic counterparts.. It is the longest, strongest, and most elastic natural vegetable fiber. The strength of hemp creates textiles that get softer with age and repeated washing, but won't lose integrity or shape like cotton. Due to the porous nature of the fibres, the fabric breathes beautifully while also capturing the body’s natural heat in air bubbles within the weave– so it can retain warmth in colder climates.

It's Non-narcotic

Industrial hemp contains CBD but almost no THC, so it’s non-psychoactive. CBD won’t get you high, but can improve immunity and reduce inflammation.

It's Healthy

A serving of hemp seeds fulfills the human daily requirement for protein and is a great alternative to meat. They’re rich in essential nutrients such as iron, magnesium and zinc that our bodies can’t make on their own. Hemp Oil contains high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, which have anti-inflammatory properties and can prevent diseases related to inflammation. It could potentially be a key food source for world populations faced with malnutrition due to lack of food.

It Saves Water

Hemp farming uses very little water, about half as much as cotton. In order to farm the cotton for a single tee shirt and jeans, it takes approximately 5,280 gallons of water. A hemp tee and pants, comparatively, takes 80 gallons– which comes mainly from rainwater. Cotton is grown in parts of the world where water is scarce, and relies heavily on irrigation.

You Can Live In It

Homes with walls built from hempcrete are fire-resistant, bug-free, rot-free, and mold-free. Houses made from hemp are exceptionally quiet from exterior and interior noise. They are also 100 percent biodegradable and can be a way to live a carbon-neutral lifestyle– since the walls can actually sequester carbon.

It Can Reverse Climate Change

Hemp has the potential to mitigate and possibly even reverse climate change by absorbing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than trees and other plants. It has a short growing cycle, which makes it an incredibly effective crop for carbon farming– which is farming that reduces Greenhouse Gas emissions by capturing and holding carbon in vegetation and soil.

 

Sources: 

SOURCES: RODALE INSTITUTE. INDUSTRIAL HEMP RESEARCH PROJECT. 2017. RODALEINSTITUTE.ORG | EHRENSING, DARYL T. 1998. FEASIBILITY OF INDUSTRIAL. HEMP PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES PACIFIC NORTHWEST. CORVALLIS, OREGON: OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN 681. | THE PEOPLE’S HISTORY. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. THE THISTLE. VOLUME 13, NUMBER 2: SEPT. /OCT., 2000. NATIONAL HEMP ASSOCIATION. THE MINISTRY OF HEMP.